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Osteoporosis and Oral Health

August 19th, 2014

Today, Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut and our team at The Snohomish Dental Care Family thought we would examine the relationship between osteoporosis and oral health, since 40 million Americans have osteoporosis or are at high risk. Osteoporosis entails less density in bones, so they become easier to fracture. Research suggests a link between osteoporosis and bone loss in the jaw, which supports and anchors the teeth. Tooth loss affects one third of adults 65 and older.

Bone density and dental concerns

  • Women with osteoporosis are three times more likely to experience tooth loss than those without it.
  • Low bone density results in other dental issues.
  • Osteoporosis is linked to less positive outcomes from oral surgery.

Ill-fitting dentures in post-menopausal women

Studies indicate that women over 50 with osteoporosis need new dentures up to three times more often than women who don’t have the disease. It can be so severe that it becomes impossible to fit dentures correctly, leading to nutritive losses.

Role of dental X-rays in osteoporosis

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) released research that suggest dental X-rays may be used as a screening tool for osteoporosis. Researchers found that dental X-rays could separate people with osteoporosis from those with normal bone density. As dental professionals, our team at The Snohomish Dental Care Family are in a unique position to screen people and refer them to the appropriate doctor for specialized care.

Effects of osteoporosis medications on oral health

A recent study showed that a rare disease, osteonecrosis, is caused by biophosphenates, a drug taken by people for treatment of osteoporosis. In most cases, the cause was linked to those who take IV biophosphenates for treatment of cancer, but in six percent of cases, the cause was oral biophosphenates. If you are taking a biophosphenate drug, let Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut know.

Symptoms of osteonecrosis

Some symptoms you may see are pain, swelling, or infection of the gums or jaw. Additionally, injured or recently treated gums may not heal: teeth will be loose, jaws may feel heavy and numb, or there may be exposed bone. Some of the steps you can take for healthy bones are to eat a healthy diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, regular physical exercise with weight-bearing activities, no smoking and limited use of alcohol, and report problems with teeth to our office, such as teeth that are loose, receding gums or detached gums, and dentures that don’t fit properly.

For more information about the connection between osteoporosis and oral health, or to schedule an appointment with Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut, please give us a call at our convenient Stanwood, Marysville, Granite Falls, or Everett, WA office!

School Supply Drive

August 13th, 2014

The Snohomish Dental Family has partnered with the Granite Falls Community Coalition and Family Support for the annual School Supply Drive! We are asking for donations of new school supplies—as well as monetary donations—to ensure that as many kids go back to school with the necessary supplies as possible.

Some of the items we are looking for include:

  • 3-Ring Binders
  • Backpacks
  • Clipboards
  • Colored Pencils
  • Composition Books
  • Copy Paper
  • Crayons
  • Dividers
  • Dry Erase Markers
  • Flash Cards (multiplication, subtraction, addition)
  • Flash Drives
  • Folders w/ pockets
  • Glue
  • Highlighters
  • Index Cards
  • Manila Folders
  • Notebook Paper
  • #2 Pencils
  • Pens
  • Erasers
  • Plastic Supply Boxes
  • Post-it Notes
  • Red Correcting Pencils
  • Rulers
  • Scissors
  • Scotch Tape
  • Sharpies
  • Spiral Notebooks
  • Washable Markers
  • Water Colors

If you would like to make a monetary donation, you can do so by going to www.gofundme.com/ahjzc0. All funds will go towards purchasing bulk school supplies for the drive which will help reduce the costs.

If you would like to donate, supplies can be dropped off at our Granite Falls location, Key Bank, Boys & Girls Club, or Family Support & Cerven Dentistry.

Please call Family Support (360.386.9282) or Granite Falls Community Coalition (206.427.9451) with any questions.

The Snohomish Dental Family thanks everyone in advance for any contribution you can make!

Broken Tooth: Is It an emergency or not?

August 12th, 2014

Have you ever had that sinking feeling after biting into something soft and chewy and feeling something hard and crunchy instead? You’ve chipped or broken a tooth, but what should you do next? First try to assess the damage by determining whether it’s a chip or a whole tooth.

As Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut will tell you, a broken or chipped tooth is usually not a dental emergency unless you are experiencing a great deal of pain or bleeding, but you should contact us for an appointment shortly afterward. Be sure to mention that you have a broken tooth so we can fit you into our schedule quickly. After a thorough evaluation, we’ll recommend a course of action. If it is a small chip, we may simply smooth it out. For a larger break, the dentist may fill in the space with a composite material that matches your other teeth.

Emergency Dental Care

If you are in severe pain, are bleeding excessively, have a major break, or have lost a tooth, that is a dental emergency and you should contact us. As emergency dental specialists, we’ll be able to schedule an appointment immediately and advise you on the next steps to take.

You can rinse your mouth with warm water and apply pressure to stop the bleeding. An ice pack will help reduce any swelling. Do not take any aspirin as that could increase the amount of bleeding. Should your tooth be knocked out completely, rinse it under running water but do not scrub it. Hold the tooth only by the crown, or the part you normally see above the gum line, not by the root. If you can, put the tooth back into the socket while you travel to our office, or put it in a mild salt solution or milk. Don’t let the tooth become dry, because this can lead to damage. Once you get to our office, our dentist will determine whether the tooth can be saved or if it will need to be replaced.

A broken tooth may not always be an emergency, but it’s best to have it treated with us at The Snohomish Dental Care Family. While it may only be a cosmetic problem at first, if left too long without treatment, you may experience further damage to your tooth and mouth.

Easing Your Allergies with Latex-Free Dentistry

August 5th, 2014

Imagine this scenario: you go to the dentist to have a cavity filled, and an hour after the procedure you have a runny nose, scratchy throat, and your arms are breaking out in blotchy, red hives. In other words, you’re in worse shape after the visit to the dentist than you were before you walked in to have the cavity fixed. If you experience any of these types of symptoms or side effects, chances are you have a latex allergy.

What is a latex allergy?

A latex allergy is a hypersensitivity to latex proteins. If you have this allergy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that you avoid direct contact with any materials that contain latex. While latex gloves are known to cause allergic reactions in people with a latex allergy, certain metals, plastics, and other materials used in dental care can also cause an adverse response.

A runny nose and itchy eyes are common allergic reactions to latex. However, Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut and our team at The Snohomish Dental Care Family want you to know it can also trigger more severe symptoms, including asthma, wheezing, and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal ailments.

A latex-safe dental environment

Many dental offices screen patients for a latex allergy. This is only beneficial, however, if you’re already aware you have a latex allergy. The best thing you can do to ease your allergies is to find a dentist who has a latex-safe environment. A latex-safe dental environment observes the following protocols:

  • All patients are screened for a latex allergy.
  • No personnel use latex gloves.
  • All latex products are removed from the patient’s vicinity, including rubber dams and elastics.
  • Work areas contaminated with latex powder are cleaned frequently.
  • Signs are posted to communicate all latex allergy procedures in case of an emergency.

If a latex allergy is part of your medical history, then it’s in your best interest to find a latex-free dental environment. To learn more about latex-free dentistry, or to schedule an appointment with Drs. Hyodo, Lee, Yi, Magelsen, Everett, Tremblay, and Dr. Peanut, please give us a call at our convenient Stanwood, Marysville, Granite Falls, or Everett, WA office!

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